Why Is K Backwards In A Strikeout

In the scorebook, a strikeout is denoted by the letter K. However, a third-strike call on which the batter doesn't swing is denoted with a backward K. This differentiation helps keep track of how the batter got out, providing more insight into the player's performance and strategy.

In the world of baseball, a strikeout is a significant event that can change the course of a game. But have you ever wondered why a strikeout is represented by the letter 'K'? The story dates back to the 1860s when it was common to say a player “struck three times” when they went down swinging. Henry Chadwick, a cricket enthusiast turned baseball reporter, decided to use the last letter in “struck” to represent the strikeout. This was because the letter 'S' was already used for 'sacrifice'.

The Evolution of 'K' in Scorekeeping

Chadwick's methods have been tweaked over the years but the “K” continues to represent a strikeout. Interestingly, the scoring symbol “K” was first used in the scoring of an actual game in 1868. Another reason the letter "K" is used is that it is made with 3 strokes of the pencil, symbolizing the 3 strikes for the strikeout.

The Introduction of the Backward 'K'

Now, let's delve into the mystery of the backward 'K'. In the scorebook, a strikeout is denoted by the letter K. However, a third-strike call on which the batter doesn't swing is denoted with a backward K. This differentiation helps keep track of how the batter got out, providing more insight into the player's performance and strategy.

The Impact of 'K' on Baseball Culture

The use of 'K' has arguably transcended the box score to a greater degree than any other shorthand notation. Fans often chant the letter in a stadium when an opponent has two strikes, and placards with 'K' on them are frequently displayed around a stadium to count how many strikeouts the home team’s pitcher has tallied.

The Legacy of Chadwick's Contribution

Chadwick's contribution to baseball scorekeeping has had a lasting impact on the sport. His choice of 'K' for a strikeout, including its backward variant, has become an integral part of baseball terminology and culture. His impact on how we describe the game was so great that Chadwick became the only journalist officially enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

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